CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

Philippines. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by. John T. Sidel. California: Stanford University Press, xii + US$, cloth. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by John T. Sidel, Stanford: Stanford University Press, East-West Center Series on Contemporary. Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local.

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For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. Read, highlight, and take notes, across web, tablet, and phone.

Everyday Politics in the Philippines: Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. Sidel is to be commended for this highly objective analysis of Philippine bossism, and an honest portrayal of the predation and violence that pervade the electoral system. These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries.

It is painfully obvious that bossism is highly damaging to Philippine society as a whole, at the very least because it corrupts electoral politics and hobbles the development of a truly representative democracy.

Government Asia Centre International Relations. The author argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development.

Capital, coercion, and crime: Find it at other libraries via WorldCat Limited preview. More in Politics—Comparative and International Politics. The comparative examples presented in the final chapter do not conclusively reinforce his assertions, nor do they show that an alternative institutional apparatus or sequence of political and economic developments would have prevented the emergence of bosses.

Bossism and state formation in the Philippines– 2. McCoy, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Other editions – View all Capital, Coercion, and Crime: These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other cooercion.

It provides a comparative historical analysis of bossism, drawing conclusions of great interest not only to scholars of Southeast Asia but to students of comparative politics as well. Local bossism flourished in Burma during the early postindependence period of parliamentary rule, but faded at least in Burma proper with the imposition of centralized military rule in Indeed, the idea that voters support bosses mainly because of their charisma and noblesse oblige is ridiculous when we face the stark reality of boss violence.

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This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic control over an area’s coercive and economic resources. Social Science Research on Sout heast A sia 5: Capital, Coercion, and Crime. Smuggling and States Along a Southeast Asian Describe the connection issue. Examples of bossism include Old Corruption in eighteenth-century England, urban political machines in the United States, caciques in Latin America, the Mafia in Southern Italy, and today’s gangster politicians in such countries as India, Russia, and Thailand.

The author, by contrast, argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development. In sum, Capital, Coercion, and Crime provides a comparative historical analysis of bossism, drawing conclusions of great interest not only to scholars of Southeast Asia but to students of comparative politics as well.

In fact, when bossism in other countries is considered, the key culprit seems to be, not a particular structural flaw in the development of national institutions, but electoral democracy itself.

Class and Status Relations in a Details and ordering information at Stanford University Press.

Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines – LSE Research Online

The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses inn two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. This is because cri,e both relies upon and reinforces the deplorable status quo in terms of widespread poverty, inequality, landlessness, lawlessness, and other socio-economic ills. Sidel, John Capital, coercion, and crime: Although an electoral democracy allows bossism to fester, it can also be its downfall.

The small-town dynasties of Cebu– 5. Capital, coercion, and crime: Skip to main content. Sidel also presents a critique of the theory that widespread bossism is evidence of a weak state. Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American coetcion rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines.

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Bossism in Comparative Perspective. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. This dependency, in turn, ensures that the Philippines will never rise above this pholippines mire for as long as bossism remains entrenched.

Physical description p. Essentialism need not be an issue if we can acknowledge that cultural models do shape material relations, but only within specific historical conditions of political and economic development. SearchWorks Catalog Stanford Libraries.

SearchWorks Catalog

Skip to search Skip to main content. Without acknowledging the local cultural context in which a state apparatus operates, the explanatory power of any political theory will be severely limited. Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Criem.

References to this book Everyday Politics in the Philippines: Vulgar displays of power e. Bossism in the Philippines, by John T.

However, there are people who actually vote freely for bosses in the Philippines, no matter philippinfs transparently corrupt they are.

Nielsen Book Data Publisher’s Summary This text focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic control over an area s coercive and economic resources. Of course, whether or not any election is blssism or truly democratic is debatable.